Good Luck Scott! (And let us introduce you to Vivayic!)

Today, the White House announced our very own Scott Stump as the nominee for Assistant Secretary for Career, Technical, and Adult Education. We couldn’t be happier for Scott and his family. To be nominated to serve our country in this capacity is a tremendous honor, and we can state unequivocally that President Trump and Secretary DeVos have chosen a man who deeply loves his country, is an educator to his core, and demonstrates leadership through integrity and developing others.

Many of you likely sought out our website when you saw the announcement and asked yourselves, “What is Vivayic, and what role does Scott play in that company?” Let me quickly introduce ourselves and share the impact Scott has made on our team. Vivayic exists to build the capacity of organizations striving to do good in the world. We do that by using learning as a strategy to execute larger organizational goals.

Vivayic exists to build the capacity of organizations striving to do good in the world. We do that by using learning as a strategy to execute larger organizational goals.

What does that look like? For our corporate clients, we drive results in sales, adoptions of systems and processes, and performance improvement by designing and developing solutions for sales enablement, product training, customer education, systems training, etc. For our NGO and public clients working to improve the performance of employees or stakeholders, many of our solutions are similar and include new program curriculum, e-learning assets, web and mobile applications, and performance support tools. A third area of our work is in career, education, and workforce success. In this area, we leverage the experience of Scott and others on our team who’ve held leadership positions to consult on strategy and help with planning and execution of new initiatives and programs.

If you’ve not heard of Vivayic, it’s likely because we work quietly in the background to help other organizations succeed. Our team members derive satisfaction from seeing action translated into results — not from getting recognized by others. Scott exemplifies that mindset. He is a tireless servant leader that has helped build our organization and guide the strategy of clients without seeking credit or recognition for his efforts.

When Scott joined our team, we needed an executive leader that could help us establish core processes, develop our people, and improve our operational effectiveness. In short, he nailed it! He’s helped us achieve all those goals and more. During his tenure, Vivayic was recognized as one of “Inc.” magazine’s 5000 fastest growing companies in 2016 and 2017. Vivayic was also named one of the “Best Places to Work” in 2017 by the same magazine. Most importantly, Scott has been a coach, mentor, role model, and accountability partner for everyone on our team. Each of us is better for having worked with Scott.

Scott is the right person. I know of no one else that will serve this country and serve career, technical, and adult education with as much honor and devotion as Scott Stump.

I’m not going to lie; I had mixed feelings when Scott told me of the possibility of the nomination. Selfishly, I want him to stay and continue to help us be the best we can be. But, with a few days of reflection, it’s easy to hope for his confirmation because I, and many of us on the Vivayic team, were career technical teachers. We get it. We understand the need for leadership during this time to help CTE and adult education evolve to meet the needs of kids and communities. Scott is the right person. I know of no one else that will serve this country and serve career, technical, and adult education with as much honor and devotion as Scott Stump. Good luck, friend! The Vivayic team is cheering for you!

— Seth Derner
Co-Founder and Co-CEO

Nuggets from mlearncon

mlearncon…there’s no autocorrect for that word. What is it?

It’s short for mobile leaning conference. For some reason I found the shortened mLearnCon kind of a mouthful to say (plus, I find it unnerving when proper nouns begin with a lower-case letter). My co-worker Craig and I went to this conference together in Silicon Valley in June. I live in Minnesota, so I found it quite unfair that it was warmer back home than it was in San Jose. (I think it’s because San Jose is in a valley, but it still seemed wrong.)

Yet, the conference was worth my while. I came away with a better understanding of Tin Can API (now called Experience API or xAPI…guess they realized “tin can” didn’t sound very futuristic or technological, but I thought it was kinda funny). I also learned what a hot topic it was for most people there, and, while some attendees were hard-core programmers and much more knowledgeable than I, some attendees were much more new to it than I, which I found comforting. (Sometimes I wonder if that’s the main purpose of conferences…confirming that you’re either behind or ahead of the game…or maybe it’s just because I’m terribly competitive.)

I also got inspired about some potential uses for QR codes. You know, those ugly white and black boxes that are kinda like UPC codes? Did you know that you can now make pretty ones?! I think there’s a future in their use with performance support. One attendee  working for a home improvement store in Canada was using them with iPad minis. Workers could scan the QR code and get instant videos, FAQs, and detailed product information in seconds. Gone would be the days of finding (well, usually after waiting for 8 minutes, looking around like a helpless DIY’er) a nice person to help you in the plumbing area, asking them an electrical question, and being sent off to search for a different person to help you. The person you’ve already met could walk you to another department, scan the QR codes on the rack, and answer your questions. I’d look for QR codes to be more helpful to consumers – and learners – in the near future.

We attended some other great sessions on creating e-books, shooting quality (yet efficiently sized) video, and using Articulate Storyline for mobile deployment. All in all, it was well worth the trip…even if was colder than Minnesota.